Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent

June 14 – November 1, 2015

Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent is the first full-scale exhibition to survey the entire career of pioneering artist and designer Corita Kent (1918-1986). For over three decades, Corita experimented in printmaking, producing a groundbreaking body of work that combines faith, activism, and teaching with messages of acceptance and hope. A Sister of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, Corita taught at the Art Department at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles from 1947 through 1968. At IHC, she developed her vibrant, Pop-inspired prints from the 1960s, mining a variety of secular and religious sources and using the populist printmaking medium to pose philosophical questions about racism, war, poverty, and religion. Her work was widely recognized for its revolutionary impact and remains an iconic symbol of that period in American history. As a teacher, Corita inspired her students to discover new ways of experiencing the world by seeking out revelation in everyday events. Bringing together artwork from Corita's entire career, this exhibition reveals the impassioned energy of this artist, educator, and activist.

Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent is organized by Ian Berry, Dayton Director of the Tang Museum, and Michael Duncan, independent curator and art critic, in collaboration with the Corita Art Center, Los Angeles. The exhibition is made possible with the generous support of the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Friends of the Tang.


Corita Kent, the sure one, 1966. Silkscreen print on Pellon, 29 3/4 x 36 inches. Collection: Corita Art Center, Immaculate Heart Community, Los Angeles, CA. Photograph by Arthur Evans, courtesy of the Tang Museum at Skidmore College.

Alexandra Grant and Steve Roden: "These Carnations Defy Language"

June 14 – November 1, 2015

Alexandra Grant and Steve Roden: "These Carnations Defy Language"
began as a seed, a conversation between the artists regarding an anthology of the French poet Francis Ponge. This exhibition stems from that conversation, which presents new individual and co-created works by Grant and Roden that highlight their use of textual sources and their own conceptual systems to inspire and structure their production.

Grant's paintings from her new series Antigone 3000 continue her inquiry of literary texts as source material for her imagery. The works in "These Carnations Defy Language" explore and map the Greek myth of Antigone from its original basis in Sophocles' text to a current exchange on the importance of Antigone to future generations with Pasadena-based poet and artist Kate Durbin. Roden introduces a new body of work titled snowbirds don't fly. His paintings, drawings, and video respond to various significant childhood images, experiences, and encounters, including Neal Adams' artistry for issue 85 of DC's Green Lantern/Green Arrow comic, a group of Domus magazines found in his father's basement, and a Hebrew prayer book belonging to his great grandfather.

In addition, the exhibition includes a collaborative series of works on paper that explore a text that has inspired both artists: Francis Ponge's Mute Objects of Expression, a book of poems from which the exhibition's title is taken. Pushing the artists' interests in language and systems beyond the gallery walls, "These Carnations Defy Language" will feature a related publication with an essay by Leslie Jones, Ph.D., Curator of Prints and Drawings at LACMA.


Alexandra Grant, I was born to love not to hate (3), 2015. Mixed media on paper backed with fabric, 126 x 72 inches. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo credit: Brian Forrest.